Terrific Toads

They have warts, they hop and they eat bugs. They aren’t going to win any beauty contests but they are an important part of the ecosystem. Some can even defend themselves by shooting poison from their eyes! For a hopping good time, try these stories about the frogs’ bumpy cousin, the toad.

toads

McToad Mows Tiny Island by Tom Angleberger
McToad likes Thursdays. Why? Because on every other day of the week, McToad mows Big Island, but on Thursdays, McToad mows Tiny Island. To do so, he puts his mower on the back of a truck, which drives to a train, which goes to a helicopter, which flies to a boat, which uses a crane to put the lawn mower onto Tiny Island. There McToad mows and drinks some lemonade, and before you know it, it’s time to turn around and go back home. But first, the mower has to get lifted by a crane, to get put back on a boat, which is lifted by a helicopter, and . . . well . . . you get the idea.

Toads on Toast by Linda Bailey
As this delightful picture book opens, Fox is bored of his usual meal of plain old toad, so he turns to a cookbook of toad recipes for inspiration. Having caught a sackful of small, young toads as recommended, Fox is deciding on a recipe when he is startled by the appearance of the mother of these small toadlets who is horrified to discover that Fox is planning to eat her babies. Stop! she commands him, to no avail. Mamma Toad frantically tries everything in her power to save her offspring, even offering herself for Fox to eat. But nothing works. Until she suggests preparing her own delicious “secret” recipe for Fox instead¬ — Toad-in-the-Hole. (The secret? No toads!)

Frog and Toad are Friends by Arnold Lobel
One summer day Toad was unhappy. He had lost the white, fourholed, big, round, thick button from his jacket. Who helped him look for it? His best friend, Frog. Another day, Frog was unhappy. He was sick in bed and looking green. Who gave him some tea and told him a story? His best friend, Toad.

Kid Sheriff and the Terrible Toads by Bob Shea
Drywater Gulch has a toad problem. Not the hop-down-your-britches, croaking-all-night toad kind of problem. The thievin’, hootin’ and hollerin’, steal-your-gold never-say-thank-you outlaw toad kind of problem.
Then hope rides into town. Sheriff Ryan might only be seven years old, and he might not know much about shooting and roping. But he knows a lot about dinosaurs. Yes, dinosaurs. And it turns out that knowing a thing or two about paleontology can come in handy when it comes to hoodwinking and rounding up a few no-good bandits. From Bob Shea and Lane Smith comes this hilarious picture book, Kid Sheriff and the Terrible Toads.

Hoptoad by Jane Yolen
A boy, his dad, and his dog are out for a drive on a beautiful sunny day. Unfortunately, a hapless toad is trying to make its way across the very same road. Talk about bad timing. Is there any hope of avoiding toad-al disaster? Maybe. See what a sharp-witted and caring boy can do to save the day.

Toad Rage by Morris Gleitzman
Limpy’s family reckons humans don’t hate cane toads, but Limpy knows otherwise. He’s spotted the signs: the cross looks, the unkind comments, the way they squash cane toads with their cars. Limpy is desperate to save his species from ending up as pancakes. Somehow he must make humans see how fabulous cane toads really are. Risking everything, he sets off on a wart-tinglingly dangerous and daring journey to . . . the Olympics?  This is the epic story of a slightly squashed young cane toad’s quest for the truth.

Warty Toads by Meish Goldish
Many people believe that a person can get warts just by touching a toad. While this enduring myth is not true, a toad’s warts are harmful to many of its predators. The warts produce a poison, and most animals that eat toads often get sick and can even die. Many animals, such as dogs and foxes, spit out a toad after just one bite because the poison tastes so bad. These are just some of the interesting facts that kids will learn when they enter the world of Warty Toads. Vivid, full-color photos will captivate kids as they see up close what these wart-covered creatures eat, how they stay safe, and the tremendous transformations that take place as these amphibians grow from tiny tadpoles to adult toads.

Have a hopping good time with these toad crafts!  Toad hat instructions courtesy of Fabiana Carter and toad bank instructions from Bluebonnet Village Craft Network.

toadhat

toadbank

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