Walking the Dream of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

In January, children at Carpenter Library celebrated Martin Luther King, Jr. Day by creating signs to promote equality and marched silently through the library wearing their signs.  Youth Services staff shared stories about civil unrest and protests and had many great discussions with the kids while they designed their signs and compared and contrasted the Civil Rights Movement to recent events in the news.

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Check out one of these chapter books about civil rights and protests from your favorite library branch:

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Revolution by Deborah Wiles
Struggling to adapt within her newly blended family in 1964 Mississippi, young Sunny witnesses increasingly scary community agitation when activists from the North arrive in town to help register African Americans to vote.

Fire in the Streets by Kekla Magoon
In the aftermath of Dr. King’s assassination in 1968, Chicago fourteen-year-old Maxie longs to join the Black Panthers, whether or not her brother Raheem, ex-boyfriend Sam, or her friends like it, and is soon caught up in the violence of anti-war and civil rights demonstrations.

One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams-Garcia
In the summer of 1968, after travelling from Brooklyn to Oakland, California, to spend a month with the mother they barely know, eleven-year-old Delphine and her two younger sisters arrive to a cold welcome as they discover that their mother, a dedicated poet and printer, is resentful of the intrusion of their visit and wants them to attend a nearby Black Panther summer camp.

A Tugging String by David Greenberg
A fictionalized account of the author’s years growing up in Great Neck, New York, during the turbulent civil rights struggles of the 1950s and 1960s, when African Americans were struggling to attain equality, with his father, who was a lawyer for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Includes commentary from the author’s father, Jack Greenberg.

Glory Be by Augusta Scattergood
In the summer of 1964 as she is about to turn twelve, Glory’s town of Hanging Moss, Mississippi, is beset by racial tension when town leaders close her beloved public pool rather than desegregating it.

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