Great Books to Celebrate Black History Month (Post II of II)

We all know raising kids can be tricky–we want to give them every opportunity to experience all that the world can offer them, the knowledge to move forward and create their own path, to learn, live, and develop into strong, independent people who will change the world, free from any preconceived notions and bias we may carry.

It is our nature to protect them, hide them from harm, and to work as much as possible so that they don’t have to know the hardships we have encountered. At the same time, we need them to know not just our story and our past, but the history of our communities and society–how far through time we have come, and how much farther there is to go–so that they may take up the challenge of further advancing the world around them for the benefit of their children, their children’s children, and beyond. Such is the reason for and importance of reflective and educating observances throughout the year.

As we’re sure you know, the theme of Black History Month this year is At the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality: The Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington. We hope that you have taken the opportunity to attend many of our great programs and read-in chains, and that you and your family can make time to join us for a few more before the end of the month. For those of you looking to continue learning at home, this week and next we’ll present a collection of books that celebrate the theme. Even more titles can be found in the back of the St. Louis Public Library Black History Month Brochure, available at any of your favorite St. Louis Public Library Locations.

And now, the second half of the list:

Children of the Emancipation by Wilma King

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Photos and first hand accounts tell the story of youth growing up and gaining freedom during the tumultuous time in American history.

Martin’s Big Words by Doreen Rappaport with illustrations by Bryan Collier

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An excellent picture-book biography of Dr. King, Doreen Rappaport uses his speeches within her own text to tell the story as vibrantly as it is depicted by Mr. Collier’s illustrations.

John Lewis in the Lead by Jim Haskins and Kathleen Benson; illustrations by Benny Andrews

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In 1963, John Lewis was the youngest speaker at the March on Washington. This book tells the story of how he began a lifetime of civil rights and public service work (in part because he was denied a library card as a teen!) and the accomplishments he has helped bring about to date.

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Great Books to Celebrate Black History Month (Post I of II)

We all know raising kids can be tricky–we want to give them every opportunity to experience all that the world can offer them, the knowledge to move forward and create their own path, to learn, live, and develop into strong, independent people who will change the world, free from any preconceived notions and bias we may carry.

It is our nature to protect them, hide them from harm, and to work as much as possible so that they don’t have to know the hardships we have encountered. At the same time, we need them to know not just our story and our past, but the history of our communities and society–how far through time we have come, and how much farther there is to go–so that they may take up the challenge of further advancing the world around them for the benefit of their children, their children’s children, and beyond. Such is the reason for and importance of reflective and educating observances throughout the year.

As we’re sure you know, the theme of Black History Month this year is At the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality: The Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington. We hope that you have taken the opportunity to attend many of our great programs and read-in chains, and that you and your family can make time to join us for a few more before the end of the month. For those of you looking to continue learning at home, this week and next we’ll present a collection of books that celebrate the theme. Even more titles can be found in the back of the St. Louis Public Library Black History Month Brochure, available at any of your favorite St. Louis Public Library Locations.

And now, the list:

Busing Brewster by Richard Michelson; illustrations by R.G. Roth

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Brewster is ready for first grade–until his mom tells him that he and his older brother will no longer be attending the neighborhood school. They’ll head across town to Central–a white school. In simple terms and storyline, Richard Michelson tells the story of school integration and that we shouldn’t fear what we don’t know.

Freedom’s Gifts: a Juneteenth Story by Valerie Wesley with illustrations by Sharon Wilson

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Set in Texas during the Second World War, Valerie Wesley’s story provides a basic explanatory primer for the reasons Juneteenth is celebrated, and outlines that freedom still has a distance to be earned.

The Other Side by Jacqueline Woodson; illustrations by E.B. Lewis

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In this simple tale, a young Caucasian girl is told not to cross the fence that separates the white from the black part of town. Still, she wants to befriend her neighbor. The solution? A fence they can share, but can that fence ever come down?

A Thousand Never Evers by Shana Burg

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Set in 1963 Mississippi, Shana Burg’s excellent and gripping novel follows young Addie Ann Picket as she comes of age in one of the most tense and potentially dangerous periods of the 20th century.

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Will You Be Our Valentine?

 

Need a last-minute valentine? Did you forget to water the roses? Did you accidentally eat all the candy? No problem. The St. Louis Public Library has you covered: as laughter is the best medicine, here’s a great treatment for all you love-sick readers out there. Grab your plastic (library card, not credit card) and pick up some of these funny, silly stories to enjoy with your special someone.

Roses Are Pink, Your Feet Really Stink by Diane deGroat

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Gilbert’s teacher asks each person to send a nice valentine to all the other members of the class, and he complies–mostly. Both Lewis and Margaret hurt his feelings recently, so Gilbert hatches a plan for write less-than-sweet messages to the two. Not everything goes to plan, and soon all three students have some apologizing to do.

Olive You! And Other Valentine Knock-Knock Jokes You’ll A-Door by Katy Hall and Lisa Eisenberg with illustrations by Stephen Carpenter

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These silly jokes will leave you tickled pink. (wait for it…) Perfect to add to any funny valentine.

Zombie in Love by Kelly DiPucchio with illustrations by Scott Campbell

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If the previous entry did leave you with enough groaners, join your new Zombie friend Mortimer, your everyman working stiff just looking for the ghoul of his dreams… (or nightmare?)

The Yuckiest, Stinkiest, Best Valentine Ever by Brenda Ferber with illustrations by Tedd Arnold

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Leon has a school-yard crush on a classmate, and can’t wait to make a valentine  for her. One problem: the valentine has no intention of cooperating. It tells Leon “Love is yucky. Stinky too. It will turn your brain to goo!” Could anything melt its heart and change the mind of the cranky, angry valentine?

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This Week at the St. Louis Public Library (February 10-16, 2013)

Happy Monday to all of you out there in cyberspace, as we noted last week, we have plenty to celebrate in February–from Black History Month to Valentines’ Day to Mardi Gras–so be sure to join us for these great activities and laissez les bons temps rouler!

Preschool Storytime:

  • Monday at Machacek, Barr, and Kingshighway Branch
  • Wednesday at Buder Branch
  • Wednesday at Julia Davis Branch
  • Friday at Central Library

Got your creative juices flowing? Join us to make:

  • Tangram Quilts Tuesday at Barr Branch
  • Stamp Art Valentines Tuesday at Kingshighway Branch
  • Lollipop Flowers Tuesday at Schlafly
  • Gnome Sweet Gnome Valentines Tuesday at Carondelet Branch
  • Valentine Cards Wednesday at Buder Branch
  • Color Scratch Hearts Thursday at Cabanne Branch
  • Valentine butterflies Wednesday at Divoll Branch
  • Love Fans Thursday at Carpenter Branch

Ready to spend some quality time with your family and friends?

  • Black History Month Scavenger Hunt Tuesday at Baden Branch
  • Wacky Wednesday (guess which day?) at Walnut Park Branch
  • Valentine’s Day Minute-to-win-It spectacular at Baden Branch on Thursday
  • Family Night Thursday at Schlafly Branch

Ready for a movie? How about:

  • Princess and the Frog Monday at Baden Branch
  • Madagascar 3 Friday at Walnut Park Branch

Have a great Week!

 

Dragon mask for Chinese New Year

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Chinese New Year is on Feb. 10th, 2013–the year of snake. Chinese all over the world will be celebrating their New Year with Dragon dance parades, fireworks, and feasts. Dragons are legendary creatures in Chinese Folk Tales. Here is how to make a dragon puppet.

You’ll need:

  • Construction paper (red, yellow, orange, and green color)
  • Chinese dragon template
  • White paper plate (large)
  • Glitter
  • Stapler with staples
  • Markers
  • Scissors
  • Craft stick (tongue depressor size)

These are the steps to make your dragon mask:

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Great Books for the Chinese New Year

This coming Sunday, February 10th, begins the 2013 Lunar New Year and the Chinese Year of the Snake. Ready to celebrate? We are too! Here are some great books to put you and your family into a festive mood and learn more about the holiday and Chinese Culture:

Dragon Dance by Joan Holub with illustrations by Benrei Huang

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Beginning readers will love learning all there is to do in preparing for and celebrating the arrival of the new year–and it’s a lift the flap book.

Bringing in the New Year by Grace Lin

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Great artwork and simple a simple story, everyone will love the arrival of the extended parade. Need more from Grace Lin? Check out her many more titles on aspects of Chinese Culture such as Dim Sum for Everyone and The Ugly Vegetables.

The Dancing Dragon by Mark Vaughn with illustrations by Stanley Wong Hoo Foon

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A short book that actually folds out so the reader can enjoy the whole parade and festivities, just like the characters.

Sam and the Lucky Money by Karen Chinn with illustrations by Cornelius Wright and Ying Hwa-Hu

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Sam receives his lucky, red envelope money and heads deep into the Chinatown festivities with his mother to find something to buy.  After a chance encounter with a homeless man, Sam isn’t so sure that his money should go to sweets or toys, but what should he do?

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This Week at the St. Louis Public Library (February 3-9, 2013)

There is quite a bit to do as we roll the calendar to February! The St. Louis Public Library will be featuring great programs all month long as we celebrate Black History Month, Mardi Gras, Chinese New Year, Valentine’s Day, and more… We welcome you to join us for any or all of our great activities this month, as always. Here are a few great ideas to get you started this week:

Storytime!

  • Monday at Baden, CabanneCarondelet, and Machacek Branches
  • Pajama Storytime Tuesday at Central Library
  • Wednesday at Carpenter, Buder Branches
  •  Thursday at Schlafly Branch
  • Friday at Central Library

African-American Read-in Chain: Celebrate works written and illustrated by African-Americans.  Join us Monday at all Branches, and Tuesday at Julia Davis Branch.

Fat Tuesday is just about a week away! Get in the spirit by making Mardi Gras Masks and crafts:

  • Tuesday at Barr Branch
  • Tuesday at Walnut Park Branch
  • Tuesday at Kingshighway Branch

Chinese New Year is Sunday, February 1oth! Celebrate early with us:

  • Thursday at Buder Branch
  • Thursday at Julia Davis Branch
  • Saturday at Carpenter Branch

Wait, there’s more:

  • Creative Kids: We are the World Globes Tuesday at Carondelet Branch
  • Creative Kids: Valentine Wreath Craft Thursday at Machacek Branch
  • XBox and Wii Gaming on Thursday at Baden Branch

Have a great week!